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20131202
20131210
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, the crucible of the world's three great monotheistic religions become known not as the subject of constant struggle, but as the golden city of peace and unity embodied the aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. peace is possible because we have courageous leaders who have already taken significant political risks for peace. the time is approaching when they will have to take even more. they have shown real courage, both president abbas and prime minister netanyahu. president abbas has made tough choices. he has stayed the course, despite people in his team saying you ought to get out of here, look at those settlements, they are making a fool of you. believe me, that battle has been going on. i deal with it every week. at the same time, there has been israeli soldiers shot and killed in the west bank and other acts of incitement. prime minister netanyahu has made tough choices. just this week, he reaffirmed his commitment to a palestinian state. he said israel is ready for an historic peace. peace is possible today because the arab league has also made tough choices. for the first
the relationship between russia and israel has been transformed. had he balance off the religion with iran in this very important position -- and russia's case -- relationship with israel? it could be very interesting to russiahis about how balance is off all of these competing demands. will make one brief comment. i think russia and the u.s. have the same interest so far as iran and nuclear weapons are concerned. nuclear powers that have nuclear weapons do not want additional powers to have nuclear weapons. it is as basic as that. i think we share that interest. this is why i think we will work together to see whether we can transform the interim agreement into something more binding. that is a good accommodation to pursue. i am a little less rosy about the overall historical relationship between russia and iran. we elected iran against russia on more than one occasion, and iran and russia have had some real problems, territorial problems throughout the years. imperial problems. so i think those who ignore history or geo-strategy would be too sanguine about the long- range prospects of th
was asked most was not about abortion or religion or anything else. the question i get asked most was my views on guns. nobody can really say, how are you going to rule in this case, how are you going to rule in that case. instead they would ask me questions that were designed to figure out who i was and what i was. a lot of people, democrats republicans, both, they would sit me down in the chair and say, did you ever hide? -- hunt? i would say to myself, that is not really what we did growing up in york city. [laughter] -- growing up in new york city. they would say, did you have friends who had -- hunt? have you ever shot a gun? have you ever held a gun? all of my answers to these questions were in their view, pathetic. [laughter] i was talking to one of the senators from idaho and he goes through these questions. he says amy, this is really -- he says to me, look, this is really important. it is important that you understand how important the gun culture is in my state. there is a lot of fear about the way you might think about second amendment issues. you may not be familiar with thi
the emergence of terrorism justified by islamic politics and certain interpretation of religion. we had the first world trade center bombing in 93 remember, and the people getting pummeled in bosnia where muslims. it was a source of concern to people all across the world. i received calls from both the polk ape and the king of saudi arabia asking me to intervene, the first time they were ever on the same issue. dick holbrooke said it was a problem from hell. and when we read discussing how everything happens at once, the aftermath with somalia, haiti, bosnia, tony lake cracked one of the best lines of all time he worked in the white house. sometimes i really miss the cold war. bosnia in some ways became a metaphor for the struggles of the 21st century. the first conflict which reminded us the end of the cold war basically took the veil off this image we were privileged to have even when it didn't comport with reality that there was a bipolar world and as dangerous as it was with nuclear weapons hanging around at least it was organized. even our spies helped each other, i used to say. if
one for the color of the color of their skin or their background or religion. people must learn to hate, and if they learn to hate they can be taught to love for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite. atlanta, georgia, go ahead. linda, hello. caller: i wanted to express my condolences to his family, and i was one of the many millions who were privileged in 1990 when he came to the new york area, and i have never forgotten that. i started my political activism earlier because i am older than obama, but i do not by shell gasoline. condolencesend my and say the world has lost a profit. i made a promise to myself and my daughter that we would see mandela, and god blessed us that we did in this lifetime also. host: here is cindy in albemarle. hello. caller: yes, hello. it is just such a tragic loss. he just truly cared about people. , if they could uch whent a bit as m they think about policy, and all this bickering and carrying on -- if they would get more love in hitheir parts they could get so much more done in a country, that if they could set their diffe
can do better and knitting mills as we look at good religion and wellness as well. >> my name is rachel gore won the academy for state health currency. what areas you mentioned the role of state. i was wondering if you could talk about what the long-term consequences easy for the different experiences people will be having from state to state. a state like new york where they've done a marketplace in their expanding a decade, consumers are having a much different experience than maybe mississippi that has a federal marketplace and aeronautics unit. speak not well, i've always thought that having remodels first aid exchanges is really a very good thing. we have the state models and we are at the are these the united states to california and kentucky in a number of states, washington, connecticut, obviously massachusetts, they've done extremely well and their performance out that to be highlighted and studied as to what it is they're doing that other states failed to do so far? the second model is the hybrid model we got partial federal involvement and partial state involvement.
religion free from fear. so for manfred and millions like him, that place was ultimately america. he passed away last year. but during his life, he designed the special menorah with a model of the statue of liberty at the base of each candle. i don't know if you have noticed that. in a moment, all nine lady liberty's will be shining as a beacon of hope and freedom, wherever you come from, whatever your faith. it beacon stays bright because of families like the one that will join me in lighting the menorah this evening, the schwitters. dad, jake emma could not be here because he is deployed in afghanistan. [applause] joined by his wonderful wife drew, his daughters lanie and kylie. the head and wave, guys. [laughter] i want you to know how proud we are of not only your dad but also of you. thewe are so grateful sacrifices you make on behalf of our country original day. tonight, we give thanks to all the men and women in uniform and for their families who make tremendous sacrifices on our behalf. on behalf of our freedom and our security, not only of us but our allies and friends around the w
. somebody a strong bailiff in their religion. i have a strong belief in my religion. it doesn't mean i'm going an extreme and do something violent that's what we have to deal with. we have to deal with the elements in whatever walk of life that will turn to violence and challenge not only societies that can't take care of themselves, but also us in our way of life. i think that's a difficult challenge that we're facing. i think as we look around the world and see societies and the underpinnings whey describe in some there's a sense of hopelessness. that's where we have to understand that. we have to decide whether we're going do anything about it or not. some cases question some case we can't. what we would like to do is help other nations and other regions of the world, certainly to be able to help themselves. that's what a global leader should do. i think that's what we try do all the time. as i see the military, with the military has been involved in over the years. that's with we try to do. it doesn't make any difference what their intkd. other questions? let me go income the back.
of marriage and all of that. i agree that you can't force a religion. you certainly cannot legislate a religion to accept it, but there is the reality, today is, that there's going to be probably 17 states by the end of this year who are waiting for the illinois law to get signed and new mexico, supreme court case to be decided, but there could be up to 17 states by the end of this year in the next several months that have gay marriage. that number is going to grow. it's not going to decrease. so this debate is on the brink of becoming moot. >> i mean, sure there are some social costs. we look at countries such as benevolence or sweden, the cohabitation rates have risen. less people getting the. more people are putting marriage off. >> is that because of gay marriage? >> harvey i think so spent it's because straight people don't want to get married. they just want to shack up spent i think we've made into a quaint social custom instead of, i think our policy would be better served strengthening marriage and making sure every child our gay speedy so how does gay marriage we can -- how
and there are ramifications for politics and religion in europe. across europe, people think this printing press is bad news and we need to find a way to control it. they say you cannot own a printer press unless you have a license from the government and all documents have to be checked. but this system fails to work immediately. they are ways of getting around the licensing requirements. when given a license, you can write under license on a document and list a different pripter -- printer or make one up -- it is hard for the authorities to figure out who printed the document and you get a fight from the de-centralized nature of the environment and the desire to control it by government. we recognize this from the 1500s and now. >> tom standage is here with us and he is the author of "writing on the wall" what is your day job? >> i am a digital editor at the economist and part of that led to my interest in historical media. we have returning to the way things used to work. and the economist came out of culture of clubs and coffee shops and discussions. there is a lot we can learn from looking at the histo
interpretation of religions. we already had the first world trade center bombing in 1993, remember, and the people hurt in bosnia were muslims. it was a source of concern to people all across the word. i received calls from both the pope and the king of saudi arabia asking me to intervene in bosnia. i wondered where that was the first time they had been on the same side of an issue. dick holbrook said it was the problem from hell. when we discussed how everything happens at once, the aftermath of somalia, highty, bosnia, tony crack the one of the best lines of all in the white house. he said, you know, sometimes i really miss the cold war. [laughter] bosbosnia in some ways was a struggle for the 21st century. it was the first conflict which reminded us that the end of the cold war basically took the vail off this image we were privileged to have, even when it did not share with reality that there was a bipolar world and as dangerous as it was, at least it was organized. even our spies helped each other out, i used to say, you know, if the russians were better off if the spies in th
ii. after the war was over, he sought a place where he could life and practice his religion free from fear. for him and millions like him, that place was america. he passed away last year but designeds life, he this special menorah with a liberty the statue of at the base of each candle. i don't know if you noticed that. in a few moments, all nine lady shining, aill be reminder that our country's -- wherever you come from whenever your faith. that beacon stays bright because the ones thatke will join me in lighting the menorah this evening. dad, jake could not be here. he is deployed in afghanistan. [applause] but we are joined by his daughter'sife, his -- go ahead and wave. drew, laney, kylie, i want you are nothow proud we only of your dad but also of you. grateful of the sacrifices that you make on behalf of our country every single day. tonight, we give thanks to all the men and women in uniform and for their families. they make tremendous sacrifices on our behalf. on the behalf of our freedom and our security. not only of us, but our allies and friends around the world including
ramifications for politics and religion in europe. rulers across europe think, oh, dear, this printing press is bad news. we need to find a way to control this, so they start imposing these controls on the press. they say you can't own a printing press unless you have a license from the government, all documents have to be checked before they can be printed. but with almost immediately this system fails to work. there are ways of getting round the licensing requirements. you can do things like when you're given a license to print be something, you know, up to say under license on -- you can just write under license on a document anyway. you can list a completely different printer from the one who actually printed it or maybe make one up. you can print under a pseudonym, and it's very hard for the authorities to figure out who has printed this document and to go and punish them. so you get this fight between the decentralized nature of the media environment and the desire to centralize and control it by governments which we recognize as a phenomenon be of the internet era, but it's actually g
their religion is to destroy us. host: we will have you respond to that. negotiating in a religious way? guest: he is right to a great extent. we arenians have said the great evil and they're going to wipe israel off the face of the earth. in the middle eastern culture, it is looked upon with high regard to get the best deal possible no matter what it takes, that includes lying. that is one reason the gulf states like to work with the u.s., because we are honest and transparent. they like doing business with us as opposed to their partners or even the communist chinese. they like doing business with people that are honest and transparent. that is an underpinning to these negotiations. once again, if you are willing to blow yourself up and commit suicide in order to blow up other people, you are not a rational person. up other people, you are not a rational person. that is to you are dealing with when you are dealing with uranian's. host: -- iranians. host: you are saying that all middle eastern countries are this way? part of the middle eastern culture to get the best deal that you can, wheth
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14

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